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Tuesday, November 13

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Thursday, May 17

  1. page Strandbeest-Ben Higgins edited ... {wind.jpg} As you can see from the actual strandbeest, its size is massive. The part that ex…
    ...
    {wind.jpg}
    As you can see from the actual strandbeest, its size is massive. The part that extends up above the body of the Strandbeest is a big part to how it collects the necessary wind. It is tilted to help guide the wind to the back leg. This back leg is now receiving wind from the top pushing down on the leg, and from the wind pushing horizontally against it. Jansen built the legs so that some parts are able to compress and move with force. The wind has a downward force, which when it hits the upper triangle of the back leg, causes the compression of the square below it. The force that it receives horizontally from the wind also helps to cause the compression, along with bringing the back leg forward. This compression is the most important part of the entire Strandbeest. With the compression, the leg
    ...
    it does.
    With most objects whose goal is speed, wind is the enemy. These objects, such as race cars, try and reduce the wind they receive in order to gain speed. With the strandbeest, this approach would just not work. The strandbeest needs as much wind as possible, due to the fact the goal is not speed, but rather motion. As I said before, this motion of the strandbeest is largely due to the upper extended part of its body. This extended area acts much like a kite. The way a kite works is by attracting as much wind as possible to allow it to stay airborne. The strandbeest is the same way in that it needs wind to keep it in motion.
    All in all, the strandbeest is one amazing, complex art form. And without wind power, the strandbeest would only be a sculpture, and not a moving sculpture.

    (view changes)
    6:21 pm
  2. page Strandbeest-Ben Higgins edited Physics in Art: The Strandbeest By Ben Higgins INTRODUCTION One of the most incredible examples…
    Physics in Art: The Strandbeest
    By Ben Higgins
    INTRODUCTION
    One of the most incredible examples of physics interacting with art is demonstrated through the Strandbeest, created by Theo Jansen, a moving structure that is powered by wind. Although there are many different species of strandbeest, the most popular is the Animaris Rhinoceros, which is a “sculpture” that looks and walks as if it were an actual rhinoceros. The Strandbeest itself is truly and amazing sight, but it is the when it walks on its own that causes disbelief. When the wind blows and hits the Strandbeest, it is able to walk on its own. Though it seems complex, the Stranbeest actually uses some very basic techniques in order to move. These techniques can relate to some different types of physics, but the main way the strandbeest relates to physics is through wind energy.
    {strandbeest9.jpg} above is the Animaris Rhinoceros specie of Strandbeest. Created in 2005, Jansen uses these strandbeest to depict real life animals.
    WIND ENERGY
    The only reason to why this amazing ‘creature’ is able to walk is because of the power it receives from the wind. The Strandbeest is able to capture this wind, and use it in order to move the legs. But the legs not only move, but they move simultaneously. Jansen was not only able to capture the wind so that the strandbeest moved, but so that all legs move at the right times in order for the strandbeest to effectively walk without problems. The Strandbeest receives power from the wind in two different ways. The first is just by the pure push of wind on the legs. The picture below is a great example of the axis of rotation on the Strandbeest’s legs, except for the axis is flipped so that it is perpendicular to the ground. The flaps that you see are what collects this wind and, in turn moves the legs. In this case the flaps are the actual legs of the Strandbeest, as they are the things that collect the wind and cause it to move. However this picture is also different in terms of how the axis the legs are on rotates. The axis itself rotates 360 degrees, but the legs do not. The leg system is designed with exact proportions so that the Strandbeest’s legs are able to move without ever rotating like a wheel. The leg system of the Strandbeest is shown below.
    {strandbeest1.jpg}
    {wind.jpg}
    As you can see from the actual strandbeest, its size is massive. The part that extends up above the body of the Strandbeest is a big part to how it collects the necessary wind. It is tilted to help guide the wind to the back leg. This back leg is now receiving wind from the top pushing down on the leg, and from the wind pushing horizontally against it. Jansen built the legs so that some parts are able to compress and move with force. The wind has a downward force, which when it hits the upper triangle of the back leg, causes the compression of the square below it. The force that it receives horizontally from the wind also helps to cause the compression, along with bringing the back leg forward. This compression is the most important part of the entire Strandbeest. With the compression, the leg
    is able to lift off the ground. Now that the leg is off the ground, the wind is powerful enough to move the leg forward. The next step of this process is the movement of the front leg. Once the back leg reaches the furthest point it can reach, energy is transferred to the front leg, which allows it to move. The back leg is now stationary, but it is still applying force to the front leg. The wind is pushing on the back leg, which causes the axis that both legs are on to rotate. This axis rotates, and causes the exact same compression on the front leg as we saw in the back leg. This is no coincidence. The two legs are exactly the same, and therefore move the same way, albeit opposite from each other. Thought the back leg doesn’t move per say, it leans, as to put and extra force onto the front leg. This lean along with the force of the axis on the front leg are what allow this animal to move as it does.
    With most objects whose goal is speed, wind is the enemy. These objects, such as race cars, try and reduce the wind they receive in order to gain speed. With the strandbeest, this approach would just not work. The strandbeest needs as much wind as possible, due to the fact the goal is not speed, but rather motion. As I said before, this motion of the strandbeest is largely due to the upper extended part of its body. This extended area acts much like a kite. The way a kite works is by attracting as much wind as possible to allow it to stay airborne. The strandbeest is the same way in that it needs wind to keep it in motion.
    All in all, the strandbeest is one amazing, complex art form. And without wind power, the strandbeest would only be a sculpture, and not a moving sculpture.

    (view changes)
    6:20 pm
  3. file wind.jpg uploaded
    6:16 pm
  4. file strandbeest1.jpg uploaded
    6:14 pm
  5. file strandbeest9.jpg uploaded
    6:09 pm
  6. page The Art Of Bass edited ... Yes, this myth is busted, at least as far as is safe to conduct this investigation. Bass could…
    ...
    Yes, this myth is busted, at least as far as is safe to conduct this investigation. Bass could not stop or interfere with your heart, seriously at least. Though it is (extremely) plausible for the compressions and rarefactions to permeate your skin and organs and for you to feel it, if you believe your heart to be pumping to the beat, it's most likely just the heavy wave of the bass hitting you and passing through, not your actual heartbeat.
    THANKS FOR READING!
    ...
    Of Bass" limit="30" ]]limit="30"]]
    List of sources used:
    http://www.dubstep-clothing.com/about/what-is-dubstep/
    (view changes)
    7:01 am

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